Wednesday, 10 September 2014

Protein Powders – Who, What, Where, Whey?





Should I have a protein powder? Should I not have protein powder? What is the difference between isolate and concentrate? Do I need to have casein? What about a pea protein? These are questions I get asked on a daily basis so let me break it down and give you the facts on the most common protein powders. 


Whey Protein Concentrate

What is it? 

The material left behind from milk being pushed through a filter, once dried and forms whey protein concentrate. This a fast release protein.

Why would I need it?

  • Help with gaining muscle
  • Help with retaining muscle
  • Weight loss
  • Achieve protein intake
  • Control appetite


When is it best used?

  • Pre – weights based workouts
  • Post – weights based work out


What else can I use it for?

  • Snack
  • Add it to smoothies
  • Use it in cooking/baking


How do I know if it’s a good protein?

  • 100% WPC
  • Grass fed cows on herbicide & pesticide pastures
  • Local (i.e New Zealand)
  • No added sweeteners, preservatives, flavours, cololurings or non-dairy protein filters


Whey Protein Isolate

What is it? 
The material left behind from milk being pushed through a filter, once dried and forms whey protein concentrate. To make whey protein isolate the concentrate is processed and purified to make a higher quality product. This a fast release protein.

Why would I need it?

  • Help with gaining muscle
  • Help with retaining muscle
  • Weight loss
  • Achieve protein intake
  • Control appetite


When is it best used?

  • Pre – weights based workouts
  • Post – weights based work out


What else can I use it for?

  • Snack
  • Add it to smoothies
  • Use it in cooking/baking



How do I know if it’s a good protein?

  • 100% WPI
  • Grass fed cows on herbicide & pesticide pastures
  • Local (i.e New Zealand)
  • No added sweeteners, preservatives, flavours, cololurings or non-dairy protein filters


Casein Protein

What is it?

Casein protein is the slow release protein that is found in 80% of cow’s milk (whey being the other 20%) and contains an abundance of branch chain amino acids. It is the dehydrated form of the solid part of the milk &  is generally in the form calcium caseinate

Why would I need it?

  • Help with gaining mass muscle
  • Help with retaining muscle
  • Avoid your body going into a catabolic state (muscle break down)


When is it best used?

  • At night – 30minutes to 1 hour before bed


What else can I use it for?

  • With whey protein pre-work out
  • In baking
  • In a smoothie


How do I know if it’s a good protein?

  • 100% Calcium Caseinate
  • Grass fed cows on herbicide & pesticide pastures
  • Local (i.e New Zealand)
  • No added sweeteners, preservatives, flavours, cololurings or non-dairy protein filters



Pea Protein

What is it?

Pea protein is a raw,vegan & gluten free form of protein made from extracting the soluble pea protein from yellow split peas.

Why would I need it?

  • Help with gaining muscle
  • Help with retaining muscle
  • Weight loss
  • Achieve protein intake
  • Control appetite


When is it best used?

  • Pre – weights based workouts
  • Post – weights based work out


What else can I use it for?

  • Snack
  • Add it to smoothies
  • Use it in cooking/baking


How do I know if it’s a good protein?

  • Hypoallergenic
  • Free from dairy, gluten, soy and nut
  • Very Fine
  • Over 80% protein bioavailability



Rice Bran Protein

What is it?

Rice bran protein is raw, vegan & gluten free form of protein made from separating the carbohydrate & protein portion of the rice.

Why would I need it?

  • Help with gaining muscle
  • Help with retaining muscle
  • Weight loss
  • Achieve protein intake
  • Control appetite


When is it best used?

  • Pre – weights based workouts
  • Post – weights based work out


What else can I use it for?

  • Snack
  • Add it to smoothies
  • Use it in cooking/baking


How do I know if it’s a good protein?

  • Hypoallergenic
  • Free from dairy, gluten, soy and nut
  • Very Fine
  • Over 80% protein bioavailability





For a range of recommended protein powders visit the NaedNutrition Store and check out Protein Powders

Wednesday, 20 August 2014

8 Ways To Increase Energy

 


A lack of energy is the most common complaint I hear amongst new clients. It is also the first improvement they

1. Drink more water

Dehydration is one of the most common signs of feeling flat, run down & tired. When you don’t have enough water your brain your blood thickens which means the heart has to work so much harder to pump blood around to your vital organs. Increasing your water will not only increase energy but it will also increase cognitive function too.

Tip: try to have a glass of water as soon as you wake up (instead of coffee) and chase every tea & coffee with the same about of water


2. Ensure you have a good night’s sleep

This is the most obvious way to boost your energy – but it is easier said than done. There can be a lot of factors that prevent your from having a good night’s sleep including

  • Electronics (TV, phone, laptop etc.)
  • Stress
  • Poor sleep environment (bed/pillow not comfortable, distractions around the room, too much light etc.)
  • Inability to switch off
  • Poor routine
  • Poor routine
  • Poor diet 
  • (and so on)
Tip: remove all electronics from the room, ensure you room is dark & spend 15minutes winding down at night time each night


3. Eat regularly 

Eating every 3-4 hours of a well-balanced diet will ensure that your blood sugar levels have less dramatic spikes & drops meaning you will feel less like you are on a roller coaster, forever trying to pick up your energy back up. Going for more than 5 hours without food can cause you to overeat as you try to compensate bringing your sugar levels back up (often of the wrong foods), not to mention that ‘food coma’ feeling once you have eaten double what you have intended

Tip: Ensure you have protein at every meal or snack and be prepared


4. Reduce the caffeine

People differ in their sensitivity to caffeine and can have very different types of reactions & it is about understanding how sensitive you are. Caffeine can increase alertness, heart rate & promote weight loss but it can also cause restlessness, difficulty in sleeping, headaches, IBS symptoms, and for a lot of people send them on a rollercoaster of energy levels.

Tip: Swap a coffee/tea/soft drink for a loose leaf herbal tea; replace the morning tea coffee with a mug of warm water with lemon


5. Increase your B vitamins

B vitamins are essential for increasing energy as they required creating a molecule of energy in the body. Most of you B vitamins required for energy are found in mushrooms, asparagus, spinach, broccoli, strawberries and sunflower seeds.

Tip: Have a snack of strawberries & sunflower seeds, as well as swapping lettuce for spinach in your salads


6. Increase your Iron intake

Iron is known to have a dramatic effect on energy levels. Our bodies generally absorb heme iron sources better (red meat) compared to non-heme iron sources (beans, legumes, brown rice, nuts) however you can absolutely have adequate iron levels consuming non-heme iron source.  Ensure you are consuming your high iron foods with high vitamin C foods (broccoli, blueberries etc.)

Tip: Add some extra beans to your salad and nuts to your stir fry

7. Decrease your refined sugars

Reducing the refined sugar in your diet will IMMEDIATELY boost your energy levels simply because consuming refined sugar peaks your insulin levels very quickly and drops them just as fast – causing you to crave more sugar to pick your energy back up and the cycle starts again. Remove them as much as possible from your diet

Tip: Swap the afternoon chocolate bar for some organic yoghurt with blueberries & chia seeds


8. Catch some rays

Low vitamin D levels are becoming more prevalent in our society. Getting 15minutes of sun on exposed skin (no sunscreen) 3 x per week can be very difficult for those you work inside in offices as well as the elderly. Vitamin D can also be found in salmon with bones, fish, fish oil, mushrooms

Tip:  Ensure you have a salmon at least once a week & go outside on your lunch break 3 x per week.
 

If you need help improving your energy simply email naednutrition@gmail.com

Wednesday, 6 August 2014

Raw Lemon Bliss Balls




This is one of the amazing recipes that the lovely Alana made on our Winter Warmers Cooking Night at Naed Nutrition HQ. (On the night we did have deconstructed bliss balls but they were divine none the less!)

These raw,vegan bliss balls are packed full of protein, essential fatty acids, and antioxidants. Ideal for a snack or a clean treat.

Makes: 12

Ingredients

  • 1.5 cups of almond flour
  • 1/3 cup coconut flour
  • ½ tsp pink Himalayan sea salt
  • 1 tbl of honey
  • 2 large lemons
  • 2 tsp of vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup of coconut oil
  • ½ cup desiccated coconut (to coat)


Method

  1. Put all of the ingredients (except the desiccated coconut) into your thermomix until well combined 
  2. Take out a table spoon at a time and roll into a ball – repeat to make 12 
  3. Roll each ball into the desiccated coconut until coated and place on a tray. Repeat with all 12 and place into the fridge for 15minutes 
  4. Serve immediately from the fridge


For more amazing recipes and thermomix tips simply visit Alana's Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Alana.Tmix
For more information on our next healthy cooking night simply email naednutrition@gmail.com